River Valley Rising
Inspiring Our Community

River Valley Rising

Inspiring Our Community

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Drug Free Communities

drug free communities infographic

The primary purpose of the DFC program is to:

  1. Establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies; as well as federal, state, local, and tribal governments to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth.
  1. Reduce substance use among youth and, over time, reduce substance abuse among adults by addressing the factors in a community that increase the risk of substance abuse and promoting the factors that minimize the risk of substance abuse.

DFC grantees are required to work toward these two goals as the primary focus of their Federally-funded effort. Grants awarded through the DFC Program are intended to support established community-based coalitions capable of effecting community-level change. For the purposes of the DFC Program, a coalition is defined as a community-based formal arrangement for cooperation and collaboration among groups or sectors of a community in which each group retains its identity, but all agree to work together toward a common goal of building a safe, healthy, and drug-free community. Coalitions receiving DFC funds are expected to work with leaders within their communities to identify and address local youth substance use problems and create sustainable community-level change through environmental strategies.

Recent data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicate increases in youth prescription drug abuse, as well as marijuana, ecstasy, and methamphetamine use. Now, more than ever, the DFC Program is needed in communities across the country to help prevent drug use and reduce its consequences. Drug problems manifest in local communities and show up in our schools, churches, health centers, and in our homes. The DFC Program helps local leaders organize to identify the youth drug issues unique to their communities and develop the infrastructures necessary to effectively prevent and respond to the disease of addiction.

ONDCP

Office of National Drug Control Policy

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/

Director: Michael Botticelli

The Obama Administration is committed to restoring balance to U.S. drug-control efforts by coordinating an unprecedented government-wide public health and public safety approach to reduce drug use and its consequences. Led by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), this effort includes a renewed emphasis on community-based prevention programs, early intervention programs in healthcare settings, aligning criminal justice policies and public health systems to divert non-violent drug offenders into treatment instead of jail, funding scientific research on drug use, and, through the Affordable Care Act, expanding access to substance abuse treatment.

A component of the Executive Office of the President, ONDCP was created by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. ONDCP advises the President on drug-control issues, coordinates drug-control activities and related funding across the Federal government, and produces the annual National Drug Control Strategy, which outlines Administration efforts to reduce illicit drug use, manufacturing and trafficking, drug-related crime and violence, and drug-related health consequences.

SAMHSA

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

http://www.samhsa.gov/

Administrator: Pamela S. Hyde, J.D.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that leads public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities.

Congress established SAMHSA in 1992 to make substance use and mental disorder information, services, and research more accessible. SAMHSA is a public agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Prevention, treatment, and recovery support services for behavioral health are important parts of the health service systems for the community. The services work to improve our health and minimize costs to individuals, families, businesses, and governments. However, people suffering from either substance use and mental disorders, or both, because of their illness are often excluded from the current health care system and instead have to rely on "public safety net" programs. Last year alone, approximately 20 million people in need of substance abuse treatment did not receive it. Further, an estimated 10.6 million people reported an unmet need for mental health care. The gap in service to this population unnecessarily jeopardizes the health and wellness of people and causes a ripple effect in costs to American communities.

CADCA

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

http://www.cadca.org/

Chairman & CEO: General Arthur T. Dean

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA), headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia, is the leading U.S. substance abuse prevention organization, representing over 5,000 community-based coalitions across the United States and in 22 countries who work to create safe, healthy, and drug-free communities. CADCA assists communities by providing the support they need to become stronger, more effective and better able to sustain population-level reductions in substance abuse rates and related problems. CADCA recognizes that drug use and abuse is a multi-dimensional public health challenge that demands comprehensive, coordinated solutions. CADCA’s approach engages parents, youth, educators, law enforcement and justice officials, civic leaders, workplaces, the faith community, health professionals, and other key sectors to leverage resources and coordinate strategies that impact the entire community. CADCA’s primary activities involve public policy advocacy, training events and conferences, youth leadership programs, technical assistance and the development of print and electronic resources in key languages.

Since 1992, CADCA has demonstrated that when all sectors of a community come together —social change happens. CADCA is the premier membership organization representing those working to make their communities safe, healthy and drug-free. We have members in every U.S. state and territory and working in 18 countries around the world. Special programs within CADCA are supporting our returning veterans and their families and training youth leaders to be effective agents of change –all through the coalition model.